Nutrition Barometer

Posted: 11/24/2012 in Advocacy

Nutrition Barometer study measures government efforts and policies to reduce malnutrition among Filipino children

Quezon City, Philippines-  In the recent research forum hosted by World Vision and Save the Children, the state of the country’s nutrition efforts were presented and scrutinized focusing on the the government’s aggregated nutrition program outcomes and the policies to support and sustain these initiatives.

According to the study, the Philippines shows weak commitment but still manages to show sound outcome, further explaining that that weak commitments combined with relatively strong outcomes may be the result of rapid economic growth.  However, this result may have masked the existence of huge inequalities particularly for children belonging to poorest households.

“Give DOH three years and we will make it sound-sound,” says Dr. Eric Tayag of the Department of Health, referring to improving Philippine commitment for children’s nutritional status as it fared frail in this criteria, but scored with “sound outcomes” in an international nutrition study launched recently.

Dr. Tayag argues nonetheless, that “if we have sound policies, we can expect better outcomes,” adding that the criteria used in gauging governments’ commitment and outcome included membership and commitments of a country to international nutrition movements such as that of the Every Woman, Every Child and the Scaling Up Nutrition Movement. 

The Nutrition Barometer: Gauging national responses to undernutrition, a report jointly undertaken and published by international non-government organizations World Vision and Save the Children, measures for the first time political and economic commitments to tackle children malnutrition in a group of 36 high-burden countries, including the Philippines.  World Vision’s Child Health Now and Save the Children’s Every One campaigns are calling on the National Government to strengthen its commitment to reduce cases of child undernutrition in the country, a hidden crisis that is accountable for more than a third of all child deaths worldwide—around 2.3 million in 2011. 

The Nutrition Barometer provides a snapshot of national governments’ commitments and progress in addressing children’s nutrition. It builds on existing indices such as the Global Hunger Index (GHI) produced by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) and the Hunger Reduction Commitment Index (HRCI) released by the Institute of Development Studies. It analyses commitments made by each country’s government to fight undernutrition and attempts to understand how these commitments move with children’s nutrition status.

Revisiting Philippine Initiatives on Nutrition

In the forum attended by government, multi-lateral, civil society organizations, and the media discussed the current situation of the country in terms of the political and programmatic support to nutrition.  Representative Bernadette Herrera-Dy, Vice Chairperson for the Committee of the Welfare of Children presented nine bills related to nutrition which are all pending at the 15th Congress, as they have been “overtaken by the RH Bill,” she admits.

“Civil society must continue to lobby for these (nutrition-related) bills to pass the Senate,” Herrera-Dy appealed.  These bills included the Magna Carta for Barangay Nutrition Scholars, expanded feeding program, and food nutritional labelling.  The solon emphasized that nutrition should be a financial and policy focus as it forms part of the government’s health banner program dubbed Universal Health Care Program or Kalusugang Pangkalahatan.

World Health Organization (WHO) representative Jacqueline F. Kitong, MD mentioned that “The problem (on nutrition) is here, scaling up is clearly needed and is urgent”.  She also urged to revisit Philippine global commitments on nutrition, reiterating as well that WHO supports the results of the Nutrition Barometer Report and the proposal for the country to become a member of the SUN Movement. 

WHO encourages “engagement of the Philippine government to increase investment in essential nutrition actions recommended by the ECOSOC and EWEC, and the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) that the Philippine government has adopted or committed to implement.”

According to WHO, the Philippine government endorsed resolution during the 65th World Health Assembly where WHO committed to support interventions to respond to problems on malnutrition, in particular the reduction of the number of stunted children by 40% by 2025. 

Since the Philippine government has endorsed this resolution and the WHO Comprehensive Plan on Maternal, Infant and Young Child Nutrition, they have committed to contribute to achieve the 6 targets of the global plan and to take measures to scale up Nutrition interventions, including stunting.  “Now the government needs to set its own targets for 2025, by reviewing its current targets to help achieve the global target.”

Tayag said that government initiative for nutrition is in place with “a national plan on nutrition, resources, and continuous implementation of activities,” which he believes contributed to the sound outcomes stated in the Nutrition Barometer Report.  He added that DOH has adopted the life cycle approach in implementing nutrition programs because nutrition should start from the health of the mother before pregnancy, underscoring the significance of support for the first 1,000 days of life. 

Tayag admits that the issue on malnutrition has taken a back seat but that it was not totally forgotten, however.  He also added that DOH continues to promote breastfeeding, a source of complete nutrition for neonates, and emphasized that the agency is not pro-Milk Code amendments.

Notes to editors

Link to report:  http://www.childhealthnow.org/resources/?q=resources

http://www.childhealthnow.org/resources/?q=resources

The Nutrition Barometer was globally launched at the UN General Assembly in New York last September 2012 by Save the Children CEO Jasmine Whitbread and World Vision CEO Kevin Jenkins. 

The Nutrition Barometer aims to provide a snapshot of national governments’ commitments and progress in addressing children’s nutrition. It builds on existing indices such as the Global Hunger Index (GHI) produced by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) and the Hunger Reduction Commitment Index (HRCI) released by the Institute of Development Studies. It analyses commitments made by each country’s government to fight undernutrition and attempts to understand how these commitments move with children’s nutrition status.

The figure of 36 countries accounting for 90% of the world’s malnourished children being able to reduce the number of stunted children by some 64 million by 2025 comes from research carried out by Save the Children.

Save the Children works in more than 120 countries. We save children’s lives. We fight for their rights. We help them fulfil their potential.

World Vision is a Christian relief, development and advocacy organization dedicated to working with children, families and communities worldwide to reach their full potential by tackling the causes of poverty and injustice.

 

 

wv logo

 

 

 

529658_10150940885137832_1636875403_[1]

 

BC-1Labs-TechUpdate_thumb3_thumb_thu                                         CloudFone SAPlang-Center_thumb3_thumb_thumb_th[2]

 

About the Author Xbox

Visit my Facebook Album by Clicking the Link HERE;

 

GraceIsland-CoverPic1clip_image003[8]

 

Visit my BlogSite;

https://larawanatkape.wordpress.com/

http://johnremir.phil-it.org/

http://thewondersoftheworlds.blogspot.com/

http://batman2010tech.blogspot.com/

eMail me at techupdate@asia.com / larawanatkape@post.com

Sponsor’s;

thinkpad_logo ms-logo_bL_thumb2_thumb1_thumb

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s